Wednesday, 6 May 2015

Ancestry adds Popular Edition Maps, 1919-1926 for England and Wales

Ancestry has released a new collection entitled UK, Popular Edition Maps, 1919-1926 (http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=60657). Here's the blurb from the site:

England’s Ordnance Survey began in 1791 in an effort to produce detailed maps of areas in southern England for military uses. Though it took the better part of a century, the Survey eventually mapped the entire country, and the maps were published between 1805 and 1874. In the meantime, the rapid expansion of railroads and urbanization had changed the face of the country, and maps were being put to greater civilian uses. New surveys led to new maps published between 1876 and 1896. These maps were revised again starting in the interwar years and are known as the Popular Edition Maps, 1919–1926.

The Popular Edition maps are included in this database. These detailed maps cover much of Britain and include features such as forests, mountains, larger farms, roads, railroads, towns, and more to help you better understand and even visualize the world your ancestor lived in.

The title is factually incorrect, as this only covers England and Wales, not the United Kingdom - Northern Ireland and Scotland are not included.

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish registers course

The follow up to the recent Scottish Research Online course, taught by yours truly and going where angels fear to tread, starts on May 13th.

Entitled Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs (Old Parish Registers, i.e. the Church of Scotland parish registers) the course takes a look at some of the most fascinating areas of Scottish genealogical research, from land records and inheritance to nonconformism and burgh records. Here is the official description:

Scotland 1750 - 1850 - Beyond the OPRs (302)

This is an intermediate level course in Scottish family history for those who are going back beyond 1850. You should have some experience with research in the Old Parochial Registers of the Church of Scotland and in using major websites for Scottish research. This course discusses sources that fill the gap when the OPRs are uninformative or missing; for example, records of parish and town administration, occupations, land transfer and taxation. Using these records involves several different locations. You will learn how to check online finding aids and how to find the most effective way to obtain records that may be online, in print, on CD or microfilm. This is the second course on Scottish research. If you have not taken Scottish Reserach Online please check its description.

Instructor: Chris Paton
  • Kirk Sessions records and parish poor
  • Burgh records and town poor
  • Occupations, taxation and early lists
  • Land transfer and the value of sasines
  • Land, inheritance and estates

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat session per week. See How the Courses Work.

STUDENTS SAID: well structured chats with opportunities for questions as well

The course costs just £49.99 and lasts 5 weeks. I post the first lesson out on the first day, Wednesday May 13th, and each Wednesday thereafter, with an online chat session held on each Tuesday evening after to discuss the contents. There is more on how the course works at http://pharostutors.com/courseshowwork.php. A dedicated discussion forum is also available throughout - and it is a lot of fun!

To book, please visit http://pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. Please note that whilst it is advisable to have done the previous course, it is not compulsory.

Hopefully I'll see a few of you there!

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Saturday, 2 May 2015

Willie Nolan to give Eneclann hosted talk in Dublin

From Eneclann (www.eneclann.ie):

Expert Workshop
Special Guest Speaker: Willie Nolan
"A lifetime [re-]searching"
Date: Thurs 14th May
Time: 3.00pm-4.30pm
Location:
Seminar Room,
National Library of Ireland.

We welcome our next guest speaker in May for the expert workshops for CPD, Willie Nolan , Willie is an historical geographer and was formerly an associate professor in the Department of Geography, UCD. Read all about Willie and this upcoming talk at http://www.eneclann.ie/2015/05/expert-workshop-willie-nolan/

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

English and Welsh Quaker records and new Australian records on FindmyPast

The latest FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) releases include the following:

* English and Welsh Quaker births, marriages and burials, 1578-1841
* Workhouse records from Southwark, Surrey, England
* Queensland Wills Index 1857-1940
* New South Wales, Returned Soldiers Settlement Loan Files 1906-1960
* New South Wales, Closer Settlement and Returned Soldiers Transfer Files 1907-1936 & 1951

For full details, visit http://blog.findmypast.com/fridays/

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Wednesday, 29 April 2015

Irish Catholic registers to go online July 8th

The National Library of Ireland (www.nli.ie) has announced that its Roman Catholic parish registers collection will go online from July 8th 2015 - here's the full press release:

National Library of Ireland Announces Launch Date for New Online Genealogy Resource

– Almost 400,000 images of Catholic parish register microfilms to be available online for free from 8th July 2015 –

The entire collection of Catholic parish register microfilms held by the National Library of Ireland (NLI) will be made available online – for free – from 8th July 2015 onwards. On that date, a dedicated website will go live, with over 390,000 digital images of the microfilm reels on which the parish registers are recorded.

The NLI has been working to digitise the microfilms for over three years under its most ambitious digitisation programme to date.

The parish register records are considered the single most important source of information on Irish family history prior to the 1901 Census. Dating from the 1740s to the 1880s, they cover 1,091 parishes throughout the island of Ireland, and consist primarily of baptismal and marriage records.

Commenting today, the NLI’s Ciara Kerrigan, who is managing the digitisation of the parish registers, said:

“We announced initial details of this project last December, and received a hugely enthusiastic response from people worldwide with an interest in Irish family history. We are delighted to announce that the project has been progressing well, and we will be able to publish all the digitised records online from 8th July onwards.

“This is the most significant ever genealogy project in the history of the NLI. The microfilms have been available to visitors to the NLI since the 1970s. However, their digitisation means that, for the first time, anyone who likes will be able to access these registers without having to travel to Dublin.”

Typically, the parish registers include information such as the dates of baptisms and marriages, and the names of the key people involved, including godparents or witnesses. The digital images of the registers will be searchable by parish location only, and will not be transcribed or indexed by the NLI.

“The images will be in black and white, and will be of the microfilms of the original registers,” explained Ms. Kerrigan. “There will not be transcripts or indexes for the images. However, the nationwide network of local family history centres holds indexes and transcripts of parish registers for their local areas. So those who access our new online resource will be able to cross-reference the information they uncover, and identify wider links and connections to their ancestral community by also liaising with the relevant local family history centre.”

The NLI is planning an official launch event for the new online resource on 8th July. Further details will be available in the coming weeks.

COMMENT: Note the release states the records are from throughout the island of Ireland, implying this will cover Northern Ireland as well. Hurrah!

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Tuesday, 28 April 2015

Norfolk title deeds talks for beginners

From Norfolk Record Office (@NorfolkRO), news of a forthcoming talk at Norfolk Heritage Centre:

Ever wanted to find out more about using title deeds to further your historical research? Then this is the event for you! Our NRO expert, Archivist Frank Meeres, will guide you through the process of finding, interpreting and using various different types of deeds. An introductory talk at the Norfolk Heritage Centre on Tuesday 5 May (1-2pm) is followed up with a practical workshop at the Norfolk Record Office where you will be able to see original documents. The workshop will run on Tuesday 12 May (at NRO) from 2-3.30pm.

This mini-course is free but booking is required. You are welcome to attend one or both of the parts of this course but it is best to attend part one to get the most from the practical workshop. Any queries please telephone (01603) 774740.

For further details and to register visit http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/title-deeds-for-beginners-tickets-16199259421

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Medieval English Genealogy website update

The Medieval English Genealogy website (www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk) has an update with news of new published additions to the Victoria County History series, abstracts for 2916 fines for several counties added to the Feet of Fines sections, new web links, and more.

For full details visit www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/updates/update.shtml

(With thanks to the Guild of One Name Studies via Twitter)

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Free trial on Irish Newspaper Archives

Claire Santry has news of another free 3 day trial on Irish Newspaper Archives - for further details see http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/2015/04/irish-newspaper-archives-three-day-free.html

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Chief Executive sought for new Scottish heritage body

From Historic Scotland:

Chief Executive sought for new lead public body for Scotland’s historic environment

A Chief Executive is being sought for a brand new lead public body for Scotland’s historic environment.

Historic Environment Scotland (HES), established by the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014, brings together two organisations - Historic Scotland and the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS).

The new organisation will be the lead public body for the historic environment in Scotland, working to deliver the Scottish Government’s Historic Environment Strategy “Our Place in Time”.

The successful candidate will lead an organisation with responsibilities ranging from looking after over 345 properties in care to having a statutory role as a regulator and advisor to ministers, to holding one of the largest photographic collections in the world. They will also lead a team of archaeologists, craftspeople, conservators and historians amongst many others, to help manage, celebrate and promote Scotland’s unique historic environment.

The new organisation will come into effect from October of this year, with a board now in place, headed up by Chair, Jane Ryder OBE.

Jane Ryder, OBE, Chair of Historic Environment Scotland, said:

“The new role as a lead public body focusses on working with, and enabling others, as part of a more collective approach. That requires crossing some conventional barriers and some creative thinking, including how we can engage with others, so that the collective approach that is laid out in ‘Our Place in Time’ can be realised.

“As the first Chief Executive of HES, the successful candidate will have a unique opportunity to be involved in the creation of a new organisation which will play a lead role in shaping the historic environment in Scotland, and in the lives of Scottish people and visitors alike, for decades to come.

“We believe there is a no more exciting and challenging role for anyone interested in Scotland’s history and in the development of modern Scotland, and look forward to hearing from candidates.”

Applications are now being welcomed with recruitment open until 18th May. For further information visit
http://www.aspenpeople.co.uk/vacancies/vacancy.php?id=225 http://www.s1jobs.com/apply/jump/570806790.html

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.

Monday, 27 April 2015

Two more New Zealand databases on Ancestry

Just released on Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk):

New Zealand, Teacher and Civil Service Examinations and Licenses, 1880-1920
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=6196

New Zealand, Sheep Returns, Owners and Officers, 1879-1889
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=6162

Further details via the links

Chris

For details on my latest book Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis, and my other genealogy guide books please visit http://britishgenes.blogspot.co.uk/p/my-books.html. To commission me for genealogical research, please visit my research site at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk.